BBC video montage on the Garissa University Attack

The BBC describes the Garissa University Attack in Kenya by Al-Shaabaab.

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U.S. Air Force Veteran Charged with Attempting to Provide Material Support to ISIL (FBI)

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“WASHINGTON—U.S. Attorney Loretta E. Lynch of the Eastern District of New York, Assistant Attorney General for National Security John P. Carlin, Assistant Director in Charge Diego G. Rodriguez of the FBI’s New York Field Office and Commissioner William J. Bratton of the New York City Police Department announced that yesterday, a federal grand jury in New York City returned a two-count indictment charging Tairod Nathan Webster Pugh, an American citizen and veteran of the U.S. Air Force, with attempting to provide material support to the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), a foreign terrorist organization, and obstruction and attempted obstruction of justice. The defendant will be arraigned on the indictment tomorrow, March 18, at 11 a.m. before U.S. District Judge Nicholas G. Garaufis of the Eastern District of New York.”

See the full press release here.

OSINT – Jundallah

Also Known As: People’s Resistance Movement of Iran (PMRI); Jonbesh-i Moqavemat-i-Mardom-i Iran; Popular Resistance Movement of Iran; Soldiers of God; Fedayeen-e-Islam; Former Jundallah of Iran; Jundullah; Jondullah; Jundollah; Jondollah; Jondallah; Army of God (God’s Army); Baloch Peoples Resistance Movement (BPRM)

Description:  The United States designated Jundallah, a paramilitary Sunni Salafi sect on the borders of Iran and Pakistan, as a FTO on November 4, 2010. Its leader, Abdolmalek Rigi, was captured and executed by Iranian authorities.

Targets: Key targets of Jundallah include Iranian military and civic members, as well as civilians.

Activities: Jundallah has executed numerous attacks against its targets, including bombings and hostage taking.

Diplomacy: Jundallah has been known to have contacted leaders of the Islamic State. Iranian and Western media sources alleged Western intelligence agencies may have assets within Jundallah.

Strength:  Estimated to be 500 – 2,000 personnel.

AO: Balochistan (Iranian-Pakistani border).

Funding and External Aid:  Unknown

Jundallah's AO, courtesy of the BBC

Jundallah’s AO, courtesy of the BBC

Local Media:

Al Monitor. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

Associated Press of Pakistan. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

The Daily Times. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

Dawn. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

Fars. Politics.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

The Frontier Post. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

The International News. Islamic State and Jundallah meeting creates ripples.” November 14, 2014. Accessed January 8, 2015.

The International News. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

IRNA. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

ISNA. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

The Nation. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

Press T.V. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

Tehran Times. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

Global Media:

Al Jazeera. Jundallah: Iran’s Sunni rebels.” June 20, 2010. Accessed January 8, 2015.

BBC. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

BBC. Profile: Iran’s Jundullah militants.” June 20, 2010. Accessed January 8, 2015.

BBC. “US lists Iran group Jundullah as terrorists.” November 3, 2010. Accessed January 8, 2015.

CNN. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

Foreign Affairs. “Tehran’s Take.” July/August 2009. Accessed January 8, 2015.

Foreign Policy. “Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

The Guardian. “Iran bombing: Profile of Sunni group Jundallah.” December 15, 2010. Accessed January 8, 2015.

NPR. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

NPR. A Look At Extremist Group Jundallah.” October 20, 2009. Accessed January 8, 2015.

The New Yorker. Preparing the Battlefield.” July 7, 2008. Accessed January 8, 2015.

NYT. Getting Close to Terror, but Not to Stop It.” November 8, 2014. Accessed January 8, 2015.

NYT. “Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

PBS Frontline. Who supports Jundallah?” October 22, 2009. Accessed January 8, 2015.

The Telegraph. US funds terror groups to sow chaos in Iran.” February 25, 2007. Accessed January 8, 2015.

VOA. Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

WaPo. “Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

Think Tanks / Academic:

AEI. “Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

Brookings. “Iran’s Terrorism Problem.” November 21, 2013. Accessed January 8, 2015.

Brookings. “Jundullah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

CFR. “Iran’s Ethnic Groups.” November 29, 2006. Accessed January 8, 2015.

CRS. “Iran: U.S. Concerns and Policy Responses.” December 17, 2014. Accessed January 8, 2015.

CRS. “Terrorism and Transnational Crime: Foreign Policy Issues for Congress.” June 11, 2013. Accessed January 8, 2015.

CSIS. “Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

CTC. “Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

ICG. “Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

LWJ. “Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

SITE. “Jundallah.” September 21, 2013. Accessed January 8, 2015.

SWJ. “Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

TRAC. “Jundallah.” Accessed January 8, 2015.

Government:

DIA. “Annual Threat Assessment.” February 11, 2014.

State Department. “Jundallah.” 2014. Accessed December 26, 2014.

State Department. “JUNDALLAH.” Chapter 6: Foreign Terrorist Organizations. Country Reports on Terrorism 2013.

OSINT – Al-Qaeda Central

Also Known As: AQ; Al-Qa’ida; al-Qa’eda; Qa’idat al-Jihad (The Base for Jihad); formerly Qa’idat Ansar Allah (The Base of the Supporters of God); the Islamic Army; Islamic Salvation Foundation; The Base; The Group for the Preservation of the Holy Sites; The Islamic Army for the Liberation of the Holy Places; the World Islamic Front for Jihad Against Jews and Crusaders; the Usama Bin Laden Network; the Usama Bin Laden Organization; al-Jihad; the Jihad Group; Egyptian al-Jihad; Egyptian Islamic Jihad; New Jihad

Description: Al-Qaeda was an international Islamic extremist terrorist organization. “The Base” was founded by Osama Bin Laden and Ayman Al-Zawahiri after the routing of Soviets from Afghanistan in 1988. The United States designated AQ as a FTO on October 8, 1999, following an AQ declaration of war in 1998 for violating Muslim holy lands because of the deployment of American personnel in Saudi Arabia for the Persian Gulf War. Osama Bin Laden was killed by DEVGRU personnel on May 2, 2011, and Al-Zawahiri took over the organization.

Targets: Key targets of the AQ include Western (the ‘far’ enemy) and secular Muslim (the ‘near’ enemy) military, civic, and citizens members.

Activities: The Taliban has executed numerous attacks against its targets, with an emphasis on high profile bombings. Key pre-9/11 attacks included the 1998 Embassy Bombings and the 2000 U.S.S. Cole Bombing. During the 9/11 attacks, 19 AQ operatives crashed 4 planes into American targets, including the Twin Towers and the Pentagon, killing around 3,000 Americans. Major foreign attacks included the 3/11 Madrid Training Bombing 7/7 Bus Bombings in the U.K. Major thwarted attacks included the attempted shoe bombing, underwear bombing, and ink canister bombing.

Diplomacy: Al-Qaeda has spawned numerous regional sects, including AQAP, AQIM, AQI, and Al-Shabaab. Al-Qaeda has been known to promote best practices with other Islamic extremist groups.

Strength:  Cadre is estimated to be severely degraded, with a number of a few hundred. Regional affiliates and like-minded persons number in the tens of thousands.

AO: Global regional affiliates, centralized on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border.

Funding and External Aid: Al-Qaeda is primarily funded by donations from like-minded persons from the Middle East.

Al-Qaeda Global Map, courtesy of the Economist.

Al-Qaeda Global Map, courtesy of the Economist.

Local Media:

Afghan Islamic Press. Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Afghanistan Times. Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Associated Press of Pakistan. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed November 25, 2014.

Bakhtar News. Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Daily Times. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed November 25, 2014.

Dawn. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed November 25, 2014.

The Friday Times. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed November 25, 2014.

The Frontier Post. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed November 25, 2014.

Khaama Press. Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

The Nation. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed November 25, 2014.

The News International. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed  November 25, 2014.

Pajhwok. Al-Qaeda.” November 25, 2014.

Tolo. Al-Qaeda.” November 25, 2014.

Global Media:

Al Jazeera. Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

BBC. Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

CNN. Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

Foreign Affairs. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

Foreign Policy. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

The Guardian. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

NPR. Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

NYT. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

Reuters. Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

VICE News. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

VOA. Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

WaPo. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

Think Tanks / Academic:

AEI. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

Brookings. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

CFR. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

CRS. “Al Qaeda-Affiliated Groups: Middle East and Africa.” October 10, 2014. Accessed December 26, 2014.

CRS. “Al Qaeda and Affiliates: Historical Perspective, Global Presence, and Implications for U.S. Policy.” Accessed December 26, 2014.

CRS. “Al Qaeda: Profile and Threat Assessment.” August 17, 2005. Accessed January 5, 2014.

CRS. “Al Qaeda: Statements and Evolving Ideology.” July 9, 2007. Accessed January 5, 2014.

CSIS. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

CTC. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

FAS. “al-Qa’ida (The Base).” Accessed January 5, 2014.

ICG. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

ISW. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

Jihadology. “Al-Qa’idah.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

SITE. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

Stanford University. “Al-Qaeda.” Mapping Militant Organizations. Accessed January 5, 2014.

TRAC. “Al-Qaeda Central.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

Government:

Defense Department. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

DIA. “Annual Threat Assessment.” February 11, 2014.

NCTC. “Al-Qa‘ida.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

State Department. “Al-Qaeda.” Accessed January 5, 2014.

State Department. “Al-Qa’ida.” Chapter 6: Foreign Terrorist Organizations. Country Reports on Terrorism 2013.

OSINT – Afghan Taliban

Also Known As: The Students; The Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan; Quetta Shura

Description: The Taliban is a Pashtun Islamist political party in Afghan, which governed the country with a draconian interpretation of Shariah law between 1996-2001, and provided Al-Qaeda with a safe-haven to plot attacks against the United States. A key institution of the Taliban is conservative madrassas on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, which indoctrinate potential fighters.

Targets: Key targets of the Taliban include Afghan and Pakistani military and civic members, as well as ISAF targets of opportunity.

Activities: The Taliban has executed numerous attacks against its targets, including cross border raids and bombings. The terrorist group has been known to assault its high value targets in Kabul, including the U.S. Embassy, the Presidential Palace, and ISAF Headquarters, as noted in the April 15, 2012 attacks.

Diplomacy: The Taliban’s leadership, such as its chief Mullah Omar, has a mutually beneficial relationship with AQ. The Taliban receives ideological guidance and best practices from AQ, while the Taliban governed areas provides AQ with a safe-haven. Moreover, the Taliban is able to work pragmatically with other Pshtun groups on the Afghanistan-Pakistan border. The Taliban has also conducted joint operations with the Haqqani Network.

Strength:  Estimated to be around 20,000

AO: Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Funding and External Aid:  The Taliban uses TNOC, such as extortion and narcotics trafficking, to fund its operations.

Afghan Taliban's AO, courtesy of the NCTC

Afghan Taliban’s AO, courtesy of the NCTC

Local Media:

Afghan Islamic Press. Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Afghan War News. “Quetta Shura Taliban (QST).” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Afghanistan Times. Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Associated Press of Pakistan. “Taliban.” Accessed November 25, 2014.

Bakhtar News. Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Daily Times. “Taliban.” Accessed November 25, 2014.

Dawn. “Taliban.” Accessed November 25, 2014.

The Friday Times. “Taliban.” Accessed November 25, 2014.

The Frontier Post. “Taliban.” Accessed November 25, 2014.

Khaama Press. Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

The Nation. “Taliban.” Accessed November 25, 2014.

The News International. “Taliban.” Accessed  November 25, 2014.

Pajhwok. Taliban.” November 25, 2014.

Tolo. Taliban.” November 25, 2014.

Global Media:

Al Jazeera. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

BBC. Taliban Conflict.” November 24, 2014. Accessed January 4, 2015.

BBC. Who are the Taliban?” November 1, 2013. Accessed January 4, 2015.

CNN. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Foreign Affairs. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Foreign Policy. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

The Guardian. “Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

NPR. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

NYT. Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Reuters. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

VICE News. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

VOA. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

WaPo. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Think Tanks / Academic:

AEI. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Afghan Analyst Network. Accessed January 4, 2015.

Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit. Accessed January 4, 2015.

Brookings. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

CFR. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

CFR. “The Taliban in Afghanistan.” July 4, 2014. Accessed January 4, 2015.

CRS. “Afghanistan: Post-Taliban Governance, Security, and U.S. Policy.” December 2, 2014. Accessed January 4, 2015.

CRS. “Islamist Militancy in the Pakistan-Afghanistan Border Region and U.S. Policy.” November 21, 2008. Accessed January 4, 2015.

CRS. “Major Islamist Militant Groups in Pakistan.” February 2013. Accessed January 4, 2015.

CSIS. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

CTC. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

ICG. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

ISW. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Jihadology. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

SITE. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

Stanford University. “Taliban.” Mapping Militant Organizations. November 28, 2012. Accessed January 4, 2015.

TRAC. “Taliban.” Accessed December 26, 2014.

Government:

Defense Department. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

DIA. “Annual Threat Assessment.” February 11, 2014.

ISAF. Accessed January 4, 2015.

NCTC. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

State Department. “Afghan Taliban.” Accessed January 4, 2015.

State Department. “Afghan Taliban.” Chapter 6: Foreign Terrorist Organizations. Country Reports on Terrorism 2013.

OSINT – Abu Sayyaf Group

Also Known As: ASG; al Harakat al Islamiyya (the Islamic Movement)

Description:  The United States designated ASH, a paramilitary splinter group of the Islamic extremist Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), as a FTO on October 8, 1997.

Targets: Key targets of ASG include Philippine military and civic members, as well as foreign civilian targets of opportunity.

Activities: ASG has executed numerous attacks against its targets, including cross border raids and bombings. ASG has kidnapped foreigners, including Americans, for ransom numerous times. ASG has also used IEDs against Philippine military patrols to devastating effect. The most notorious ASG bombing effort was the 2004 attack on SuperFerry 14 in Manila Bay, resulting in 116 deaths.

Diplomacy: ASG has been known to work with personnel from Jemaah Islamiya.

Strength:  Estimated to be around 400 personnel

AO: Southern Philippine Islands, with a heavy concentration in Mindanao.

Funding and External Aid:  ASG has been funded by kidnaping for ransom, as well as donations from Jemaah Islamiya.

ASG's AO, courtesy of the NCTC

ASG’s AO, courtesy of the NCTC

Local Media:

Business World. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Inquirer. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Malaya Business Insight. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Manila Bulletin. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Manila Times. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Philstar. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Global Media:

Al Jazeera. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

BBC. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

BBC. Who are the Abu Sayyaf?” August 22, 2002. Accessed December 31, 2014.

CNN. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Foreign Affairs. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Foreign Policy. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

The Guardian. “Philippines.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

NPR. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

NYT. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Reuters. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

VICE News. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

VOA. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

WaPo. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Think Tanks / Academic:

AEI. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Brookings. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

CFR. “Abu Sayyaf Group.” May 27, 2009. Accessed December 31, 2014.

CRS. “Abu Sayyaf: Target of Philippine-U.S. Anti-Terrorism Cooperation.” January 25, 2002. Accessed December 31, 2014.

CRS. “Al Qaeda and Affiliates: Historical Perspective, Global Presence, and Implications for U.S. Policy.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

CRS. “The Republic of the Philippines and U.S. Interests.” April 5, 2012. Accessed December 31, 2014.

CRS. “Terrorism in Southeast Asia.” October 16, 2009. Accessed December 31, 2014.

CSIS. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

CTC. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

FAS. “Abu Sayyaf Group.” May 4, 2006. Accessed December 31, 2014.

ICG. “Philippines.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Jihadology. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Naval Postgraduate School. “THE PHILIPPINE RESPONSE TO TERRORISM: THE ABU SAYYAF GROUP.” December 2004. Accessed December 31, 2014.

Stanford University. “Abu Sayyaf Group.” Mapping Militant Organizations. August 6, 2013.  Accessed December 31, 2014.

TRAC. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Government:

Defense Department. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

DIA. “Annual Threat Assessment.” February 11, 2014. Accessed December 31, 2014.

NCTC. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

State Department. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

State Department. “ABU SAYYAF GROUP.” Chapter 6: Foreign Terrorist Organizations. Country Reports on Terrorism 2013.