“Did the New Spooks on the Block Really Fix U.S Intelligence?” (Foreign Policy)

James Clapper

“For decades intelligence reformers sought to centralize the U.S. intelligence community in a single office with real power over budgets, personnel, and operations. Ten years ago they finally got their wish. Following an intense congressional fight, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) set up shop in April 2005 with high expectations. The office was supposed to ensure the kind of inter-agency coordination that was supposedly missing before the 9/11 attacks. It was to be the fulcrum of sharing and collaboration among agencies with long histories of mutual suspicion and occasional disdain. Ultimately it sought to unify a sprawling constellation of civilian and military agencies into “fully integrated intelligence community” that would “inform decisions made from the White House to the foxhole.”

See the article here.

The Office of the DNI’s Greatest Hits (Foreign Policy)

James Clapper

“The DNI post was the centerpiece of landmark legislation enacted in 2004, informed by the findings and recommendations of the 9/11 Commission. Presidential, legislative, and bureaucratic politics all contributed to a compromise law that sought to improve information sharing and strengthen central leadership of our sprawling intelligence enterprise without infringing upon existing military and departmental chains of command. Ten years of experience offers an opportunity to take stock and ask whether the government is smarter and the country is safer as a result of these changes.”

See the full debate here.

Disrupting the Intelligence Community America’s Spy Agencies Need an Upgrade (Foreign Affairs)

John Brennan CIA

“Some 40 years have passed since the Church Committee’s sweeping investigation of U.S. intelligence practices, fresh on the heels of the Watergate scandal. And ten years have gone by since the last major reorganization of the country’s spy agencies, enacted in the wake of 9/11. Both efforts led to a host of reforms—among them, the creation of the Senate and House Intelligence Committees, the passage of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), and the adoption of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act, which I helped shepherd through Congress.”

See the full article by Jane Harman.

Accepting Al Qaeda: The Enemy of the United States’ Enemy

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“Since 9/11, Washington has considered al Qaeda the greatest threat to the United States, one that must be eliminated regardless of cost or time. After Washington killed Osama bin Laden in 2011, it made Ayman al-Zawahiri, al Qaeda’s new leader, its next number one target. But the instability in the Middle East following the Arab revolutions and the meteoric rise of the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) require that Washington rethink its policy toward al Qaeda, particularly its targeting of Zawahiri. Destabilizing al Qaeda at this time may in fact work against U.S. efforts to defeat ISIS.”

See the article here By Barak Mendelsohn.

DNI James Clapper on What Keeps Him Up at Night (Mar. 2, 2015) | Charlie Rose

“James Clapper, the Director of National Intelligence and the President’s senior advisor on intelligence and espionage issues, tells Charlie Rose about the one issue he loses sleep over. The full interview airs March 2, 2015 on PBS.”

President Obama Speaks at the Summit on Countering Violent Extremism (White House)

Published on Feb 18, 2015

At the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, D.C., the President delivers remarks at the Summit on Countering Violent Extremism, February 18, 2015.”

Original Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXERU3IrvrU

See the Countering Extremism Strategy