OSINT – Abu Sayyaf Group

Also Known As: ASG; al Harakat al Islamiyya (the Islamic Movement)

Description:  The United States designated ASH, a paramilitary splinter group of the Islamic extremist Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), as a FTO on October 8, 1997.

Targets: Key targets of ASG include Philippine military and civic members, as well as foreign civilian targets of opportunity.

Activities: ASG has executed numerous attacks against its targets, including cross border raids and bombings. ASG has kidnapped foreigners, including Americans, for ransom numerous times. ASG has also used IEDs against Philippine military patrols to devastating effect. The most notorious ASG bombing effort was the 2004 attack on SuperFerry 14 in Manila Bay, resulting in 116 deaths.

Diplomacy: ASG has been known to work with personnel from Jemaah Islamiya.

Strength:  Estimated to be around 400 personnel

AO: Southern Philippine Islands, with a heavy concentration in Mindanao.

Funding and External Aid:  ASG has been funded by kidnaping for ransom, as well as donations from Jemaah Islamiya.

ASG's AO, courtesy of the NCTC

ASG’s AO, courtesy of the NCTC

Local Media:

Business World. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Inquirer. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Malaya Business Insight. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Manila Bulletin. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Manila Times. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Philstar. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Global Media:

Al Jazeera. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

BBC. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

BBC. Who are the Abu Sayyaf?” August 22, 2002. Accessed December 31, 2014.

CNN. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Foreign Affairs. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Foreign Policy. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

The Guardian. “Philippines.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

NPR. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

NYT. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Reuters. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

VICE News. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

VOA. Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

WaPo. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Think Tanks / Academic:

AEI. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Brookings. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

CFR. “Abu Sayyaf Group.” May 27, 2009. Accessed December 31, 2014.

CRS. “Abu Sayyaf: Target of Philippine-U.S. Anti-Terrorism Cooperation.” January 25, 2002. Accessed December 31, 2014.

CRS. “Al Qaeda and Affiliates: Historical Perspective, Global Presence, and Implications for U.S. Policy.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

CRS. “The Republic of the Philippines and U.S. Interests.” April 5, 2012. Accessed December 31, 2014.

CRS. “Terrorism in Southeast Asia.” October 16, 2009. Accessed December 31, 2014.

CSIS. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

CTC. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

FAS. “Abu Sayyaf Group.” May 4, 2006. Accessed December 31, 2014.

ICG. “Philippines.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Jihadology. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Naval Postgraduate School. “THE PHILIPPINE RESPONSE TO TERRORISM: THE ABU SAYYAF GROUP.” December 2004. Accessed December 31, 2014.

Stanford University. “Abu Sayyaf Group.” Mapping Militant Organizations. August 6, 2013.  Accessed December 31, 2014.

TRAC. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

Government:

Defense Department. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

DIA. “Annual Threat Assessment.” February 11, 2014. Accessed December 31, 2014.

NCTC. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

State Department. “Abu Sayyaf.” Accessed December 31, 2014.

State Department. “ABU SAYYAF GROUP.” Chapter 6: Foreign Terrorist Organizations. Country Reports on Terrorism 2013.

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